Writer

Well... I wrote another book! Here's an introduction to MARIA OUT OF TIME, a time travel story with family at its heart.

Back in 2035, a woman named Jessica Wallace invented a virtually indestructible metal, changing the face of manufacturing throughout the world. Her descendants have all been inventors, improving upon and adding to the previous Wallace women’s work. In 2125, Raelyn Wallace combines their inventions to create a time machine. Also in 2125, Raelyn’s daughter, Maria, has still not finished her pre-college requirements, and prefers looking at historical fashions to memorizing physics equations.

When a rogue historian dramatically announces that Jessica Wallace cheated on the college entrance exam that kicked off her rise to fame, the Wallaces’ charmed life falls apart. The public turns on the Wallace family, accusing them all of cheating their way through their accomplishments. Maria, desperate to reclaim her family’s good name, uses the time machine to go back to 2003 to prove that her famous ancestor really was the genius everyone thought she was. Amazingly, teenage Jessica Wallace ends up being a lot more fun than the rest of the Wallace women. Maria finally feels like someone in her family understands her.

Taking the time machine out leaves it vulnerable to being stolen, however, and the Wallaces’ biggest rival is waiting in the wings to do exactly that. He’s got a decades-long grudge against the Wallaces, and he thinks he can fix everything by erasing them from history. Now Maria will somehow have to restore her family’s honor while keeping the time machine out of the rival’s hands. Having Jessica Wallace on her side will help—if Maria can convince her of the truth about their family.

Here's the opening to Maria's story:

“Bye, Taejun!” I called. “See you later!”

My best friend, Taejun, and I stood in the small entryway of my family’s apartment. The front door was open, and the brisk February air outside hit me like a slap in the face, such a sharp contrast to the warm air behind me. I waved at no one, then shut the heavy front door as loudly as I could. The electronic lock whirred and chimed, confirming that yes, it still worked.

Behind me, Taejun rolled his eyes. “That sounded completely realistic, Maria. Very good. I’m sure they’re fooled.”

It was the fourth night in a row we’d played out that farce, ever since Taejun’s crappy student apartment flooded and his building got shut down. I elbowed him, then stomped towards my room loudly enough so my parents would be sure to hear a single set of footsteps, and not notice Taejun’s second set right behind mine.

“You should just carry me,” he said, and pretended to jump on my back. Except he didn’t pretend enough, and actually clipped me in the back of the knee, sending me into the floor with him right on top of me. Taejun’s a skinny guy and all, but still—the apartment definitely rattled. A disadvantage of living in a home built in the twenty-first century.

“Maria?” my dad called from upstairs. “You okay?”

I tried to roll over onto my back so I wasn’t talking into carpet, but Taejun’s weight made it difficult. “Yeah! I tripped! I’m fine!” I yelled from the floor. “Everything’s great!” It was the most my dad and I had said to each other all day.

Taejun covered my mouth before I could say anything else. His fingertips were soft on my cheek. “Are you nervous?” he whispered into my ear. “You’re talking too much.”

It’s one of my bad habits, which he knew perfectly well after living with me for three days. So I appreciated that he kept me from giving the game away. We both stayed perfectly still, waiting to see if my dad would come down to investigate my clumsiness. I held my breath, and suddenly I could feel Taejun’s heart thumping against my chest. It seemed faster than it should have been. Mine was probably doing the same thing. My nerves were a mess, both from Taejun practically smothering me and from the knowledge of what we were about to do.

If any of my friends were sneaking a guy into their room, they’d be having sex that night, guaranteed. But me? The heir to the Wallace dynasty? Taejun didn’t know it yet, but we were going to steal my mom’s time machine.


Another one of my books is GHOST GIRLS, an 80,000-word work of speculative fiction for young adults. Think FANGIRL crossed with UNDEAD GIRL GANG.

To get into her dream college’s exclusive creative writing program, Ella Andrews has to submit a writing sample with her application. No big deal; writing’s always been her thing, and her estranged father even bought her a laptop to encourage her. But the sample asked for is longer than anything she’s ever written, and Ella’s anxiety won’t chill out long enough for her to come up with the perfect idea.

An idea finally presents itself when Neesha, a girl from Ella’s school, confides that strange things have been happening at her house, and she suspects a ghost is causing them. Ella is skeptical, but teaming up with Neesha to hunt the ghost is exactly the unique experience she needs to write a killer application. So what if ghosts aren’t real? But when strange things start happening—including a food tornado in the school cafeteria—even Ella can’t deny that something freaky is going on.

After the food tornado, Ella and Neesha are joined by popular-girl Micah, the only other student brave enough to record the ghost’s destructive behavior instead of run from it. With their arsenal of a Ouija board, an EMF meter, and Micah’s fancy camera, they study the ghost in an effort to banish it. Ella’s skepticism vanishes as the attacks increase. The food tornadoes turn into flying rocks and exploding lights, and people are getting hurt.

Ella’s anxiety over balancing her application and the ghost hunt leads to a fight with Neesha and Micah. Ella can’t take back the things she’s said, but she’ll have to take control of her anxiety to reunite with her friends—the only people in town who don’t think the escalating destruction is just misbehaving students. While the ghost makes great story fodder, Ella and her friends must solve their ghost problem, or the next attack could kill someone.


I have another YA novel in my back pocket, called RESET. If you remember this post, it's the book I signed on with Jill Corcoran to represent. RESET was not submitted to publishers before Jill left agenting, and I hope it manages to find a home someday.

When the universe resets itself, no one notices—except for Lia Tobin. Since she was six years old, Lia’s been able to recognize when the universe has erased the future and given her a chance to live life differently. The flip side of this gift? She can’t control when it happens.

After the disappearance of her 10-year-old sister, Lia would give anything to be able to make the universe reset itself so she could have a chance to save Maddy. But the universe is uncooperative, which forces Lia to live through the rest of her senior year as the girl with the missing sister, watch her parents’ marriage dissolve, and finally discover Maddy’s body. All without a single chance at a do-over.

Until her former classmate, Jay Garza, is murdered, and the universe resets six months. Suddenly, Lia’s dream has come true: she has a chance to save her beloved little sister. But by being hyper protective of Maddy, Lia completely ignores Jay, until the universe makes it clear that his life is a priority, too. Choosing between Jay and Maddy seems like a no-brainer, until Lia meets someone else who recognizes the resets. She learns that ten years in the future, Jay is a celebrated researcher on the brink of developing a cure for cancer. Saving Jay now feels like saving the whole world.

But then Maddy disappears again. In fact, every time Lia focuses on protecting Jay, Maddy disappears. When Lia shifts her attention back to Maddy, terrible things happen to Jay. Lia is reset to avert each catastrophe, but she knows she must do more than fix things—she’s got to find out who’s responsible. As she knows only too well, the universe could stop resetting whenever it chooses, leaving Jay or Maddy to a terrible fate.